Summer Camps

Summer Dance Intensive

Ages 8-18
July 11-22, 2016 (M-F; 8 AM – 4 PM)
Performance: Friday, July 22, 7 PM ($11 tickets at the Carver Box Office and Ticketmaster)
Every summer, over 40 students aged 8-18, participate in a two-week dance intensive led by the legendary Dallas Black Dance Theatre. Students explore modern, jazz, ballet, hip-hop, and African dances, resulting in a performance on the Carver Jo Long Theatre stage. It is highly recommended that students have had formal dance instruction prior to the intensive.

 

Summer Theatre Camp

Ages 6-18
June 6-25, 2016 (M-F; 8 AM – 4 PM)
Performances: Friday, June 24, 7 PM and Saturday, June 25, 3 PM

The three-week theatre camp offers elementary through high school students an opportunity to develop and strengthen acting, choreography, and vocal skills. The camp features two concurrent camps for different age groups: Camp Red (ages 6-10) and Camp Blue (ages 11-18), both culminating in two stage performances on the Carver Jo Long Theatre stage.

 

Camp Red (6-10 years): Dr. Seuss’ “The Sneetches”

Summary
The Sneetches is about two types of creatures, separated by having or not having stars on their bellies. The Star-Belly Sneetches think they are the best, and look down upon Sneetches without stars. The Plain-Belly Sneetches remain depressed and oppressed, prohibited from associating with their star-bellied counterparts, until Sylvester McMonkey McBean comes along with his Star-on and Star-off machines. He begins to give stars to the Plain-Belly Sneetches, and soon they are happy, for they look like their elite counterparts. The original Star-Belly Sneetches are angry at no longer being different and special, so they get Sylvester to remove all their stars. This continues back and forth until no one can remember which Sneetches were originally what, and an epiphany strikes them all at once: that it really doesn’t matter whether a Sneetch has a star belly or not – they are all really the same, and can coexist and be friends with one another.Interpretation
This story teaches children a valuable lesson through not-so-subtle metaphor as only Dr. Seuss can. It provides the message that race and ethnicity need not be dividing lines in our society, and that we can coexist peacefully, regardless of our external differences.

Camp Blue (11-18 years): Hairspray Jr. (musical)